5 results for tag: Financial Research


Five Problems with Financial Information

With over 12 years of experience in financial markets, I have seen conflicts of interest that financial information can produce. Over 40 million in the U.S., that is one out of every eight people, are pursuing honest, free, and transparent information. However, I couldn’t distinguish between reliable and untrustworthy information, even with years in the industry. I knew we had to address this problem. We identified five critical problems in stock financial publications, and addressed how we are solving them with a dynamic, interactive, and user-friendly social network: 1. No evidence exists that shows that people are doing what they are ...

Be Patient on the Line

LINE Corp ($LN) IPO’d today, July 14th, in what is being described as the biggest tech IPO of the year. Initially, LINE had planned to offer 35 million shares at a price range of $26.50 to $31.50 per share. Today, they made its debut on the New York Stock Exchange at $42 per share, with a high of $44.49. This would give the company a valuation of over $9 billion. The company will be offering 22 million shares on the NYSE and the remaining 13 million will be on the Tokyo stock exchange. This article will analyze the success (or failure) of LINE’s IPO from perspectives of leadership, profitability, innovation, and growth. https://twitter.com/NY...

Twilio Shows Exactly Why Tech Unicorns Are Valuable

Where did all the IPOs go? The number of IPOs this year has dropped. Significantly. If you look at May and June filings, that becomes readily evident. In May and June of 2015 there were 29 and 39 IPOs, dropping this year to 8 and 9, respectively. But even last year's IPOs barely topped public-to-private deals. So what’s going on here? And why did Twilio IPO if other companies aren't?  There are three core reasons for the slump in IPOs recently. First, there are the lingering effects of investment unease from the 2008 stock market crash. The overall economy simply hasn’t rebounded to full bullish levels. As a result, investors are still ...

Learning from Warren Buffett

Humble Beginnings It started with Coca-Cola: as a boy, Warren Buffett bought six-packs from his grandfather’s Omaha grocery store for 25 cents, then sold the bottles for 5 cents each. By age 11, he had learned to analyze stock price charts and bought his first shares; at 12, he worked two paper routes; and, at 14, he claimed deductions ($35) for his bicycle and watch on his first-ever tax return. Fast-forward a few years. At 19 he graduated from college; at 25, he launched his limited investment partnership firm; and, by 35, had control of a New England textile company named Berkshire Hathaway. The rest, as they say, is history. Warren ...

And the winner is…

Peeptrade is proud to announce that the winner of our $5,000 trading contest is Nicholas Rossolillo! The contest winner was determined by the Sharpe Ratio, a metric for risk-adjusted return. The competition was very close in this contest, and we would like to congratulate all of the other top contestants below! Trader Sharpe Ratio Nicholas Rossolillo 9.615 Elite Wealth Management 5.766 London Fielding 5.021 Cyrus 3.553 Brayne Rowland 2.450 Sinead Aleksovski 1.943 Jonathan Maula 1.480 Travis Chingo 1.347 IRA Eligible Portfolio 1.268 Alex Fotopoulos 0.757 If you’re interested ...