12 results for tag: research


Twitter: What is it, Who wants it, and Why?

There is an old proverb about an elephant and a group of blind men, who are asked to reach out, touch the creature, and describe what they feel. To the man who grasps the tail, it is like a very thick rope; to one who feels a leg, like a tree trunk; and to one who touches an ear, like a huge fan… None are actually incorrect, but no one can agree on what the creature actually is. Twitter (TWTR) is like that: “What the heck is it?” It is.. a utility which allows you to catch the latest headlines? a way to engage potential buyers or clients? a gold mine of data about millions of consumers? And what is Twitter worth, anyway? ...

What Strategy Will Pay Off in the University Challenge?

When investment teams face off, who will use data most effectively? This is exactly what graduate students will learn in the Peeptrade University Challenge when student teams, each managing a $10,000 portfolio funded by Peeptrade, compete for prime results. This challenge, which begins October 3rd and ends December 2,  gives students the actual experience of investment and risk management while also raising money for charities that the students have chosen. Come December 3, teams from these participating university business schools will present final results and defend their investments before a panel of experts:  University of Ch...

Netflix and chill until Q3 is over

On July 18th , Netflix ($NFLX) released its earnings report for Q2, and it is fair to say that it is quite disappointing. At its release after closing bell, its share price fell from $98.81 to $84.88 overnight. This is because investors lost trust in Netflix as a profitable stock. They cite Netflix’s un-grandfathering strategy and increasing competition as two main reasons behind Netflix’s inability to acquire new customers in Q2.  Why Netflix rallied From June 27th to July 18th, Netflix’s stocks rose by almost 16%, from $85.33 per share to $98.81 per share. This rally comes with the news of its partnership with Comcast, as well as the ...

Be Patient on the Line

LINE Corp ($LN) IPO’d today, July 14th, in what is being described as the biggest tech IPO of the year. Initially, LINE had planned to offer 35 million shares at a price range of $26.50 to $31.50 per share. Today, they made its debut on the New York Stock Exchange at $42 per share, with a high of $44.49. This would give the company a valuation of over $9 billion. The company will be offering 22 million shares on the NYSE and the remaining 13 million will be on the Tokyo stock exchange. This article will analyze the success (or failure) of LINE’s IPO from perspectives of leadership, profitability, innovation, and growth. https://twitter.com/NY...

Nintendo! I Choose You!

Nintendo breaks records with Pokemon Go Pokemon Go was released to the public on July 6, 2016. Within a day, the app was on more Android phones than Tinder in the US. Within two days, the app was installed on 5.16% of all Android devices in the US. As a result, Nintendo Co’s stock ($NTDOY) surged 20% in the company’s best day of trading in over 30 years. Nintendo also added $9 billion to its market cap. But how will this impact Nintendo’s growth moving forward? Is the game just a fad or is it the beginning of something more promising? https://twitter.com/DavidInglesTV/status/752303662215618560 Not a fad With Pokemon Go’s recent ...

The Future of Barnes & Noble to Include Alcohol

Will Barnes & Noble survive if it serves alcohol and offers full-service dining? Barnes & Noble's executive team is betting that if stores offer alcohol and full-service dining, book-loving customers will come more often and stay longer. With that in mind, Barnes & Noble has announced that four suburban pilot stores in New York, California, Minnesota, and Virginia will begin doing so in 2017. According to Jaime Carey, president of development and the restaurant group, this is the way to “create a better bookstore.” In an interview with Fortune magazine, Carey put it this way: “We already have a cafe, so we said let’s have ...

Learning from Warren Buffett

Humble Beginnings It started with Coca-Cola: as a boy, Warren Buffett bought six-packs from his grandfather’s Omaha grocery store for 25 cents, then sold the bottles for 5 cents each. By age 11, he had learned to analyze stock price charts and bought his first shares; at 12, he worked two paper routes; and, at 14, he claimed deductions ($35) for his bicycle and watch on his first-ever tax return. Fast-forward a few years. At 19 he graduated from college; at 25, he launched his limited investment partnership firm; and, by 35, had control of a New England textile company named Berkshire Hathaway. The rest, as they say, is history. Warren ...

And the winner is…

Peeptrade is proud to announce that the winner of our $5,000 trading contest is Nicholas Rossolillo! The contest winner was determined by the Sharpe Ratio, a metric for risk-adjusted return. The competition was very close in this contest, and we would like to congratulate all of the other top contestants below! Trader Sharpe Ratio Nicholas Rossolillo 9.615 Elite Wealth Management 5.766 London Fielding 5.021 Cyrus 3.553 Brayne Rowland 2.450 Sinead Aleksovski 1.943 Jonathan Maula 1.480 Travis Chingo 1.347 IRA Eligible Portfolio 1.268 Alex Fotopoulos 0.757 If you’re interested ...

2016 Predictions from Peeptrade’s Favorite Investments Firms

The year 2015 is over and some of the outcomes that it brought us were low prices in oil (and commodities), strength in the US dollar, a strong deceleration of China, low growth in the Eurozone and recessions in some developing countries. As the year ends the 2016 predictions start to come and here are what our favorite investment firms are forecasting. (more…)

What Hiccup? Amazon Still King

A few days ago, Amazon Web Services (AWS) had a bit of a glitch. Basically, there was a server issue in Virginia with DynamoDB, a NoSQL database service that is part of the AWS portfolio. As a result, the infrastructure for Netflix, Product Hunt, SocialFlow, Reddit, and many more was disrupted. It’s not the first time this has happened, either. In 2013, AWS suffered a similar outage that took down the likes of Instagram, Vine, and Airbnb. According to Forbes, the outage cost Amazon roughly $66,000 per minute. Despite these outages, however, Amazon’s stock price didn’t seem to be affected. Why? Because unlike Apple, Amazon has strong leadership ...